Here’s why ChatGPT might be ‘at capacity’ for you right now

AI-powered ChatGPT has recently been frustrating a sizable number of potential new users due to its own popularity.

The amount of traffic on the site has been known to cause it to crash, preventing people from creating new accounts. The good news is that the solution is quite simple.

ChatGPT and OpenAI logos.

OpenAI’s breakout chatbot star ChatGPT (released in November 2022) uses machine learning to generate responses from questions or queries entered by users. It’s been blowing people’s mind in how mature and chatty it is (and also how horribly inaccurate with facts it can be).

In the last few days, reports have flooded in from those who wanted to create a new account on ChatGPT’s site couldn’t due to traffic congestion.

What visitors saw was a message that read: “Chat GPT is at capacity right now.” Basically, that meant that the website is in high demand and had reached its capacity for users per session and/or query load. The servers powering ChatGPT are very expensive to run, and OpenAI appears to have putting limits on that usage following the incredible explosion in interest.

Amusingly, instead of canned messages, ChatGPT has been doling out creative ways to relay its at-capacity status. So far, people have seen the chatbot communicate in limerick rhymes, a rap, and even in pirate-speak. While the crashes have been frustrating, at least visitors have found the messages entertaining.

Personally, I had no trouble creating a new account and/or chatting away, but if you’re facing this error, the solution is quite simple: You just need to wait.

Understand that ChatGPT is still a prototype, and its popularity can occasionally overwhelm the server. People have reportedly been able to use the site after waiting for about an hour or less.

Beyond that, ChatGPT has recently announced that a premium tier version is in the works, which you can now join a waitlist for. This is a way for OpenAI to monetize the chatbot and give prioritized access to paid subscribers.

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